movie film review | chris tookey
 
     
     
 

Eros

 (15)
© Unknown - all rights reserved
     
  Eros Review
Tookey's Rating
1 /10
 
Average Rating
4.48 /10
 
Starring
Gong Li, Chang Chen, Robert Downey Jnr
Full Cast >
 

Directed by: Wong Kar-Wai , Steven Soderbergh , Michelangelo Antonioni
Written by: Wong Kar Wai , Steven Soderbergh , Tonino Guerra

 
 
 
Released: 2004
   
Genre: DRAMA
FOREIGN
ROMANCE
PORTMANTEAU
   
Origin: US / Italy / Hong Kong / China / France / Luxembourg / UK
   
Colour: C
   
Length: 104
 
 


 
Pretentious, soft-core porn portmanteau, which contains the worst work ever of three famous directors.
Reviewed by Chris Tookey

Bookmark and Share

The first is a would-be erotic chunk of tedium by Wong Kar Wei (who’s currently the most fashionable of the three, and whose segment will consequently be the most favourably reviewed). Set against the SARS epidemic, it shows a prostitute (Gong Li) dying of the disease, while still able to arouse the libido of a shy tailor who is besotted with her. There are moments of passion and beauty here, but the pace is turgid, and the depth and development of character minimal.

The second is a meaningless, meandering, drearily repetitive piece by Steven Soderbergh, about an ad executive (Robert Downey Jr) recounting an incredibly boring and unerotic sex fantasy to his shrink (Alan Arkin) who appears even less interested in it than the audience is.

The third manages – amazingly – to be even more tiresome, and is by the man to whom Eros is dedicated, the clapped-out nonagenarian Michelangelo Antonioni, whose last watchable film – Blowup – was made forty years ago.

The Dangerous Thread of Things is a rambling, pretentious, atrociously dubbed, incompetently performed account of a husband and wife bickering and breaking up.

If ever there was any doubt that Antonioni is a breast man, this movie dispels it. Essentially, this is an excuse for various generously-bosomed ladies to disrobe and dance about. It has all the allure and sophistication of a porno movie imagined by Peter Cook’s great park-bench intellectual, E.L.Wisty.


Key to Symbols