movie film review | chris tookey
 
     
     
 

Female On The Beach


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  Female On The Beach Review
Tookey's Rating
4 /10
 
Average Rating
4.50 /10
 
Starring
Joan Crawford , Jeff Chandler, Jan Sterling
Full Cast >
 

Directed by: Joseph Pevney
Written by: Robert Hill, Richard Alan Simmons

 
 
 
Released: 1955
   
Genre: DRAMA
SO BAD
   
Origin: US
   
Length: 97
 
 


 

A wealthy widow (Joan Crawford, pictured right) falls for a young beach bum (Jeff Chandler, pictured left) who may be about to kill her.

Reviewed by Chris Tookey

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A camp classic, with Crawford wildly out of control and a memorably daft screenplay. Sample lines... (1) Crawford to Chandler: "I would have you if you were hung with diamonds upside down!" (2) Crawford to her lover's inquiry if he should make the coffee, "If you don't, I'll beat you."
MIXED
"Will not disappoint [Crawford] admirers... Extreme ferocity is once again the keynote of her characterisation ... The more tender moments... are less convincing... The first hour... with its bored, impatient, rancid mood and its exasperated love-hate scenes, is by far the best."
(MFB)
"Connoisseurs may appreciate the ecstasy of ill-humour to which [Crawford] now devotes herself... A glimmer lights those saurian eyes."
(Sunday Times)
"Hot, heavy - and very tacky... Outrageously trashy script is crammed with sexual double entendres. A must for Crawford fans - but don't expect anything resembling a good movie."
(Maltin)
"One of the more delirious of the late Crawfords."
(Shipman)
ANTI
"Slow and old-fashioned mystery thriller... Miss Crawford and Mr Chandler labor grimly toward a storm-lashed climactic scene. Their progress is rendered no more fetching by the inanities of a hackneyed script and the artificiality and pretentiousness of Miss Crawford's acting style. At the end, the guilty party is revealed in a ridiculous way."
(Bosley Crowther, New York Times)
"Absurd and jaded rehash of Love From A Stranger , enlivened by some hilarious love-hate dialogue."
(Halliwell)


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