movie film review | chris tookey
 
     
     
 

Forbidden Planet


© Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer - all rights reserved
     
  Forbidden Planet Review
Tookey's Rating
6 /10
 
Average Rating
7.71 /10
 
Starring
Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis , Leslie Nielsen
Full Cast >
 

Directed by: Fred McLeod Wilcox
Written by: Cyril Hume


 
 
 
Released: 1956
   
Genre: ADVENTURE
SCIENCE FICTION
   
Origin: US
   
Length: 98
 
 


 
PRO Reviews

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“Imaginative gadgets galore, plus plenty of suspense and thrills, make the production a top offer in the space travel category.”
(Variety)
“It offers some of the most amusing creatures conceived since the Keystone Cops... If you've got an ounce of taste for crazy humor, you'll have a barrel of fun.”
(New York Times)
“During the first ten minutes of this film it is pleasantly obvious that there is to be no allegorical finger-shaking, but science-fiction in the best strip-cartoon tradition... delightful hokum.”
(Films and Filming)
“I haven't enjoyed a science-fiction so much since Them! … Ingenious, inventive, spectacular- Forbidden Planet has another distinction. It is the first Freudian space-film; and to all the Beasts and Creatures we can now add the Thing from the Id.”
(Dilys Powell)
"A cunning parody of the shine and double talk of science fiction."
(Financial Times)
"Engaging science fiction hokum with its head in the psychological clouds and the tongue planted firmly in cheek."
(Sunday Express)
“An ingenious script, excellent special effects and photography, and superior acting (with the exception of Francis), make it an endearing winner.”
(Geoff Andrew, Time Out)
“Elaborate beyond the dreams of sf fans, Forbidden Planet was and still is the most remarkable of sf films, the ultimate recreation of the future, a studio-bound extravaganza where every shot is taken under artificial light and on a sound stage. The system begun by George Pal had reached its logical conclusion; everything was false, everything controlled. Reality was not permitted to intrude on this totally manufactured, totally believable world. “
(John Baxter, Science Fiction in the Cinema)

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