movie film review | chris tookey
 
     
     
 

Daylight

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  Daylight Review
Tookey's Rating
5 /10
 
Average Rating
4.33 /10
 
Starring
Kit Latura ............ Sylvester Stallone, Madelyne Thompson ..... Amy Brenneman, Roy Nord .............. Viggo Mortensen
Full Cast >
 

Directed by: Rob Cohen
Written by: Leslie Bohem

 
 
 
Released: 1996
   
Genre: ACTION
DISASTER
THRILLER
   
Origin: US
   
Colour: C
   
Length: 109
 
 


 
MIXED Reviews

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"The cinematic equivalent of a golden oldies station, where you never encounter anything you haven't grown to love over the years... Every group of trapped civilians always includes one hothead who wants to take command, one tearful child, one bickering couple, one heroic guard, a few bad guys who turn out to be good guys, and, yes, one dog. The mommy in one family helpfully reads a description of the tunnel aloud so her family can appreciate the experience they are having, and we can get information crucial to the plot... [It] pays homage to the special effects cliche of the year, the Visibly Approaching Fireball. The best science available informs us that an explosion expands too quickly to be seen at close quarters - but not in the movies, where the occupants of cars have time to see the approaching fireball, scream and duck behind the dashboard... Stallone is good, too, in a thankless role. At one point, when a trapped civilian asks him if they have a chance, I expected him to say, 'Calm down, lady. I've done this in a dozen other movies.'"
(Roger Ebert)
A fairly rousing piece of schlock... In the older-woman Shelley Winters slot we find British actress Claire Bloom as a prim aristocrat. Bloom's a class act, and she doesn't even attempt to play this material for laughs or for camp value, which is a shame. In Poseidon, you had such jolly ham bones as Borgnine, Winters, Jack Albertson and Stella Stevens, and their reckless overacting gave the film a kind of trashy, goony blast. What Daylight lacks is the knowledge of its own limitations.
(Edward Guthmann, San Francisco Chronicle)

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