movie film review | chris tookey
 
     
     
 

Doctor Zhivago / Dr Zhivago


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  Doctor Zhivago  / Dr Zhivago Review
Tookey's Rating
7 /10
 
Average Rating
7.61 /10
 
Starring
Omar Sharif, Julie Christie , Tom Courtenay
Full Cast >
 

Directed by: David Lean
Written by: Robert Bolt . From the novel by Boris Pasternak.

 
 
 
Released: 1965
   
Genre: DRAMA
ROMANCE
COSTUME
EPIC
   
Origin: US
   
Length: 192
 
 


 
ANTI Reviews

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"Mr Bolt has reduced the vast upheaval of the Russian Revolution to the banalities of a doomed romance... The necessities of drama - of acton and supense - are not served by the fact that these two people are possessed by a strange passivity... This may be faithful to Pasternak, but it makes for painfully slow going and inevitable tedium in a film."
(Bosley Crowther, New York Times)
"It is all too bad to be true: that so much has come to so little, that tears must be prompted by dashed hopes instead of enduring drama."
(Newsweek)
"lt isn't shoddy (except for the music); it isn't soap opera; it's stately, respectable, and dead. Neither the contemplative Zhivago nor the flow of events is intelligible, and what is worse, they seem unrelated to each other."
(Pauline Kael)
"The biggest disappointment of 1965... There is nothing holding the effects together, not an idea, or a feeling, or a mood, or even much of a plot, and a relatively capable cast struggles helplessly with Robert Bolt's disconnected, uninspired dialogue as the film bumbles along to boredom... Imperceptibly, David Lean has evolved into the middlebrow's answer to the late Cecil B. DeMille."
(Andrew Sarris, Village Voice)
"Pedestrian."
(Isabel Quigly, Spectator)
"A long haul along the road of synthetic Iyricism."
(MFB)
"Visually impressive in a picture postcard sort of way. Otherwise an interminable emasculation of Pasternak's novel, seemingly trying to emulate Gone With The Wind in romantic vacuity... Steiger and Courtenay excepted, all the performances are very uncomfortable."
(Tom Milne, Time Out)


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